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3 edition of Inorganic carbon uptake by aquatic photosynthetic organisms found in the catalog.

Inorganic carbon uptake by aquatic photosynthetic organisms

International Workshop on Bicarbonate Use in Photosynthesis (1984 Pacific Grove, Calif.)

Inorganic carbon uptake by aquatic photosynthetic organisms

proceedings of an International Workshop on Bicarbonate Use in Photosynthesis, August 18-22, 1984, commemorating the seventy-fifty anniversary of the University of California, Davis, 1909-1984

by International Workshop on Bicarbonate Use in Photosynthesis (1984 Pacific Grove, Calif.)

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Published by American Society of Plant Physiologists in Rockville, Md .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Photosynthesis -- Congresses.,
  • Aquatic plants -- Physiology -- Congresses.,
  • Carbon -- Metabolism -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by William J. Lucas, Joseph A. Berry.
    ContributionsLucas, W. J., Berry, Joseph A., 1941-, American Society of Plant Physiologists., University of California, Davis., Carnegie Institution of Washington. Dept. of Plant Biology.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQK882 .I59 1984
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvi, 494 p. :
    Number of Pages494
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2539033M
    ISBN 100943088054
    LC Control Number85020014

    Some physiological characteristics of photosynthetic inorganic carbon uptake have been examined in the marine diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Cyclotella sp. Both species demonstrated a high affinity for inorganic carbon in photosynthesis at pH, having K 1/2 (CO 2) in the range to mmol m −3 and O 2− and temperature‐insensitive CO 2 compensation concentrations in the range.   The ability of photosynthetic organisms to use CO2 for photosynthesis depends in part on the properties of Rubisco. Rubisco has a surprisingly poor affinity for CO2, probably because it evolved in an atmosphere that had very high CO2 levels compared with the present atmosphere. In C3plants the K m.

    Aquatic photosynthetic organisms can modulate their photosynthesis to acclimate to CO2-limiting stress by inducing a carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) that includes carbonic anhydrases and inorganic carbon (Ci) transporters. However, to date, Ci-specific transporters have not been well characterized in eukaryotic algae. Previously, a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (lcr1) was Cited by:   N2 - Aquatic photosynthetic organisms can modulate their photosynthesis to acclimate to CO2-limiting stress by inducing a carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) that includes carbonic anhydrases and inorganic carbon (Ci) transporters. However, to date, Ci-specific transporters have not been well characterized in eukaryotic by:

    Decreasing the pH at mM inorganic carbon, and thus enhancing the CO 2 by fold, only slightly increased photosynthesis, suggesting that bicarbonate was the major assimilated form of inorganic carbon. At mM inorganic carbon, only Lobophora exhibited a Warburg effect on photosynthesis (49%), but at mM, Turbinaria and Laurencia were Cited by: This paper reviews progress made in elucidating the inorganic carbon concentrating mechanism in cyanobacteria at the physiological and molecular levels. Emphasis is placed on the mechanism of inorganic carbon transport, physiological and genetical analysis of high-CO2-requiring mutants, the polypeptides induced during adaptation to low C02, the functional significance of carboxysomes, and .


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Inorganic carbon uptake by aquatic photosynthetic organisms by International Workshop on Bicarbonate Use in Photosynthesis (1984 Pacific Grove, Calif.) Download PDF EPUB FB2

: Inorganic Carbon Uptake by Aquatic Photosynthetic Organism (): William J. Lucas, Joseph A. Berry: Books. Inorganic Carbon Uptake by Aquatic Photosynthetic Organisms [Lucas and Berry] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Lucas and Berry.

Inorganic Carbon Uptake by Aquatic Photosynthetic Organisms: Proceedings of an International Workshop on Bicarbonate Use in Photosynthesis, August, Commemorating the Seventy-fifty Anniversary of the University of California, Davis, Inorganic carbon uptake by aquatic photosynthetic organisms: proceedings of an International Workshop on Bicarbonate Use in Photosynthesis, August, commemorating the seventy-fifty anniversary of the University of California, Davis, / edited by William J.

Lucas and Joseph. Inorganic carbon uptake by aquatic photosynthetic organisms: proceedings of an International Workshop on Bicarbonate Use in Photosynthesis, August, commemorating the seventy-fifty anniversary of the University of California, Davis, In: Lucas WJ, Berry JA (eds) Inorganic carbon uptake by aquatic photosynthetic organisms.

American Society of Plant Physiologists, Rockville MD, USA, pp – Google Scholar Spencer W, Bowes G () Limnophila and Hygrophila: a review and physiological assessment of their weed potential in by: 5.

photosynthetic carbon supply. First, a large amount of the total carbon may be in the form of bicarbonate, which is not available to some aquatic plants, and carbonate, which is probably not used directly by any aquatic plant. Secondly, rapid photosynthesis can quickly reduce the [CT], raise the pH of the water and shift the positions of the.

Book Description: Aquatic Photosynthesis is a comprehensive guide to understanding the evolution and ecology of photosynthesis in aquatic environments. This second edition, thoroughly revised to bring it up to date, describes how one of the most fundamental metabolic processes evolved and transformed the surface chemistry of the Earth.

Abstract: Intertidal macroalgae experience continual alternation of photosynthesis between aquatic state at high tide and aerial state at low tide.

The comparative photosynthetic responses to inorganic carbon were inves2 tigated in the common intertidal macroalga Ulva lactuca L. along the coast of Shantou between aquatic and aerial state. Inorganic carbon, largely as dissolved carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, is the primary source of carbon for photosynthesis and the generation of organic substances.

These organic compounds are generated by cyanobacteria, algae, and higher plants both within the lakes or rivers or externally within the drainage basin and variously imported to the water bodies.

The articles in this special issue of Photosynthesis Research arose from the presentations given at the Eighth International Symposium on Inorganic Carbon Uptake by Aquatic Photosynthetic Organisms held from May 27 to June 1, in New Orleans, Louisiana USA.

The meeting covered all the aspects of CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) present in photosynthetic Cited by: 2. The ability to concentrate inorganic carbon (Ci) within their cells enables cyanobacteria to compensate for the discrepancy between the Km(CO2) of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase ( μM) and.

The articles in this special issue of Photosynthesis Research arose from the presentations given at the Eighth International Symposium on Inorganic Carbon Uptake by Aquatic Photosynthetic. Abstract. The rates of CO 2-dependent O 2 evolution by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, grown with either air levels of CO 2 or air with 5% CO 2, were measured at varying external a pH range of tothe external concentration of CO 2 required for half-maximal rates of photosynthesis was constant, averaging 25 micromolar for cells grown with 5% CO 2.

Cited by: J.A. Inorganic Carbon Uptake by Aquatic Photosynthetic Organisms. 5 American Society of Plant Physiologists, Monograph Series, Rockville, MD, p. Particulate organic carbon or POC. The most essential input for the DIC is the solution of atmospheric CO 2, underground pool, inorganic carbon bound in sediments, chemical and biological processes in the hypolimnion.

The biological input is the respiration of organisms, while photosynthesis and chemosynthesis are the biological outputs. The DOC (dissolved organic carbon) pool is a.

Aquatic photosynthetic micro-organisms have adapted to the variable and often-limiting availability of CO 2, and inorganic carbon (Ci) in general, by development of inducible CO 2 -concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) that allow them to optimize carbon by: Here, we show, based on theoretical calculations and field monitoring evidence, that there is an important but previously underestimated sink for atmospheric CO 2 as DIC-dissolved inorganic carbon that results from the combined action of carbonate dissolution, the global water cycle and the photosynthetic uptake of DIC by aquatic organisms in.

Inorganic carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) catalyse the accumulation of CO 2 around rubisco in all cyanobacteria, most algae and aquatic plants and in C 4 and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) vascular plants. CCMs are polyphyletic (more than one evolutionary origin) and involve active transport of HCO 3 −, CO 2 and/or H +, or an energized biochemical mechanism as in Cited by:   The amount of inorganic carbon is one of the main limiting environmental factors for photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria.

Using Synechococcus elongatus PCCwe characterized metabolic and transcriptomic changes in cells that had been shifted from high to low CO2 levels. Metabolic phenotyping indicated an activation of glycolysis, the oxidative pentose phosphate Cited by:.

The supply of inorganic carbon (Ci; CO 2 and HCO 3 –) is an environ-mental rate-limiting factor in aquatic photosynthetic organisms.

To overcome the difficulty in acquiring Ci in limiting-CO 2 conditions, anactive Ciuptake system calledthe CO 2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) is induced to increase CO 2 concentrations in the chloroplast by:   Abstract.

Unlike in land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to carbon dioxide (CO 2) to compensate for the low diffusivity and potential depletion of CO 2 in water.

Concentrations of bicarbonate and CO 2 vary greatly with catchment geology. In this study, we investigate whether there is a link between these concentrations and the frequency of Cited by: 5.In Inorganic carbon uptake by aquatic photosynthetic organisms.

Edited by W.J. Lucas and J.A. Berry. The American Society of Plant Physiologists. pp. –Cited by: 2.